Java apps in Tbricks by Itiviti

By Katarina Klangby, Director Content Marketing
May 16, 2016
Share:

The basic design concept of Tbricks by Itiviti is modular: a high-performance system core is complemented by independent apps that contain all business logic. The apps are ready to use out-of-the-box but can also be customized, often using zero lines of code. However, when coding is required, C++ has been the only option — until Tbricks 2.8, due out in May. For the first time, Tbricks now offers a Java apps API. We asked Tom Williams, Assistant VP Sales Engineering Itiviti to explain.

Tom Williams, C++ or Java — does it really matter?

There are pros and cons with both languages, of course.  A Java fan might say that Java is more user friendly, while the C++ advocate could argue that C++ is faster. But in the end, I think it boils down to personal preference, the firm’s current code base and the right tool for the job.

Why does Itiviti introduce Java apps in Tbricks?

To keep an edge in the constantly changing financial markets, our customers need the power to adapt their systems at any time. Tbricks is Itiviti’s main trading platform going forward, and it was designed for change from the start. All Tbricks’ business logic is delivered as apps combined with a high-performance core. All apps come with development tools and complete source code, allowing you to customize or copy them to use as blueprints for proprietary apps. With the introduction of the Java apps API, the transition to Tbricks is easier if you already have in-house Java competence and a Java code base, as you might if you currently use Orc Liquidator by Itiviti.

Will all Tbricks features be available in both languages?

Yes, there will be complete feature parity between the Java and C++ APIs. Anything you can do in C++, you can also do in Java.

If a firm has no preference, would you recommend Java or C++?

Anything you can do with an app with the C++ API in Tbricks, you will also be able to do with Java, but my advice would be to use both depending on the use case. As a general rule, for anything extremely latency-sensitive you should still use C++.  The core of Tbricks (as with Orc Liquidator) is written in C++, meaning that any code written in Java requires a translation through a middle-layer which adds a little overhead. On the other hand, time to market might be quicker with Java, especially if the developer is used to that language.  

As an example, if you were writing a trading strategy you may use C++ because performance is important, at the cost of potentially taking longer to implement. If you were writing an app that is not latency-sensitive, such as an app to manipulate static data or a risk report, you might use Java to speed up time to market.

It is really less about learning Java or C++, and more about learning how to write an app in Tbricks. If you’re used to one of the languages, you can switch between the two quite comfortably, at least on the level required to create or customize a Tbricks app.  We want people to focus on writing business logic, not boilerplate code. Our core technology takes care of a lot of this anyway so that you can just focus on writing what’s important to you.

What is the single most important advantage of Java-enabling Tbricks apps?

The Java apps API is a new choice for rapid development, empowering firms to leverage their existing Java code base as well as the huge selection of open source, third party and enterprise integration solutions that are available to the Java community.

The Java apps API will be introduced in Tbricks 2.8, due out in May.

Related Content

MiFID II: the need for a centralized messaging platform

MiFID II: the need for a centralized messaging platform

Risk & Compliance With the pressure of initial implementation now a distant memory, MiFID II-regulated firms are turning their attention to the real work required to create sustainable long-term solutions. For many, the race to meet the January 3 deadline meant implementing temporary compliance processes that were far from perfect. Unless updated and improved, these could lead to […] July 10, 2018

The evolution of enterprise testing

The evolution of enterprise testing

FIX Infrastructure Testing in the financial industry is changing, both as a consequence of new regulatory requirements and in response to changing perceptions of the value it generates. In this video, Pawan Sharma – VP Global Services at Itiviti – delves into the factors that have driven the evolution of testing practices and the key challenges that […] June 19, 2018

The new Itiviti

The new Itiviti

Execution Following the merger between Itiviti and ULLINK in March 2018, Richard Bentley – Chief Product Officer of the combined company – talks to The TRADE about the new company at IDX London 2018. On the agenda: the rationale behind the merger, the company’s individual and combined strengths, product strategy going forward, key priorities for the […] June 11, 2018

Moving towards enterprise level testing

Moving towards enterprise level testing

FIX Infrastructure Over the years, testing has increasingly become a strategic activity that is seen less as a cost and more as an opportunity to maximize efficiency and support business activity. As trading systems have become more and more complex, the demands on testing tools have simultaneously grown, paving the way for their evolution into increasingly refined […] June 7, 2018

Itiviti Talks

Get our view on global capital markets

Subscribe

Subscription successful

Thank you for subscribing!

Close window

Itiviti Talks

Get our view on global capital markets

Weekly email

    Trends in global capital markets from a technology perspective.

By submitting this form, you acknowledge that data collected by us will be handled in accordance with our Privacy Notice.